Hipatia

Biblioteca de acceso libre con materiales sobre antropología, complejidad y caos.

Archivos para septiembre, 2009

Conferencia de Albert László Barabási

El día 15-9 en la Fundación Telefónica ( Gran Vía 28, Madrid)  habrá  una conferencia de Albert László Barabási sobre REDES Y PROPIEDADES EMERGENTES . Sí no saben quién es Barabási, pueden googlearlo y se enteran.

El evento podrás seguirse en directo por www.fundacion.telefonica.com/debateyconocimiento
Se puede participar enviando preguntas a través de Twitter al usuario @fundacionTef

Más información en la Web de Fundación Telefónica

Everett M. Rogers – Diffusion of Innovations

Choice the name of Everett Rogers…is virtually synonymous with the study of the diffusion of innovations….His coverage is comprehensive, ranging from the elements of diffusion and the history of diffusion research to generators of innovation, change agents, and the consequences of innovations. Among the many features that make this an exemplary interdisciplinary effort are Rogers’s clear, literate style and his ability to stay in touch with social realities. He sets a high standard for social theorists.

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A documentary on networks, social and otherwise

This looks at network dynamics. The objective is to understand the common themes that different networks have both in the physical and social world. Some of the big hitters like Duncan Watts and Barabasi are featured here. Popular ideas like six degrees of separation is also investigated (part 1)

Las otras partes pueden buscarlas en youtube con la etiqueta “A documentary on networks, social and otherwise”.

Michael Agar – We Have Met the Other and We’re All Nonlinear: Ethnography as a Nonlinear Dynamic System

“Ethnography” and “Social Science” have always had an awkward relationship. As
far as research practice goes, ethnographers often feel that they have more in
common with investigative reporters,
historians, and intelligence analysts
than they do with colleagues in sociology
and economics. The usual social research
chant of “theory/hypothesis/measurement/
sampling design/significance
level” does not describe much of what
ethnographers do.
For an ethnographer, what’s interesting is the discovery of connections. A holistic
perspective is foundational for anthropology, sort of a proto-systems theory, which
helps explain why two anthropologists, Gregory Bateson and Margaret Mead, participated
in the post-World War II conference that founded cybernetics.
It’s not that ordinary social science isn’t allowed to look for connections. It’s that
ordinary social science begins with variables already given by some theory, and then
tries to figure out how to locate, decontextualize, and measure those variables. A
card-carrying holist notices a “variable” in a situation, maybe one that he/she had
never thought about before, but then he/she wonders what other things it might be
connected with, in that situation and outside of it. The goal is to build patterns of
many interacting things that include what was noticed, not to isolate what one was
supposed to notice and measure it.
“Ethnography” and “Social Science” have always had an awkward relationship. As far as research practice goes, ethnographers often feel that they have more in common with investigative reporters, historians, and intelligence analysts than they do with colleagues in sociology and economics. The usual social research chant of “theory/hypothesis/measurement/sampling design/significance level” does not describe much of what ethnographers do. For an ethnographer, what’s interesting is the discovery of connections. A holistic perspective is foundational for anthropology, sort of a proto-systems theory, which helps explain why two anthropologists, Gregory Bateson and Margaret Mead, participated in the post-World War II conference that founded cybernetics. It’s not that ordinary social science isn’t allowed to look for connections. It’s that ordinary social science begins with variables already given by some theory, and then tries to figure out how to locate, decontextualize, and measure those variables. A card-carrying holist notices a “variable” in a situation, maybe one that he/she had never thought about before, but then he/she wonders what other things it might be connected with, in that situation and outside of it. The goal is to build patterns of many interacting things that include what was noticed, not to isolate what one was supposed to notice and measure it.
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Michael Agar – Bio
Michael Agar received his undergraduate degree from Stanford and his Ph.D. in linguistic anthropology from the Language-Behavior Research Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. An honorary Woodrow Wilson Fellow, NIH Career Award recipient, and currently Fulbright Senior Specialist, he is professor emeritus at the University of Maryland, College Park, with adjunct appointments in Speech Communication and Comparative Literature, as well as an associate at Antropokaos at the University of Buenos Aires in Argentina. He was recently appointed Distinguished Scholar at the International Institute of Qualitative Methods at the University of Alberta. Visit: www.ethknoworks.com

Duncan Watts – Seis Grados de Separación

Duncan J. Watts, uno de los principales arquitectos de la teoría de las redes, explica en la presente obra la innovadora investigación que él y otros científicos están realizando para entender el funcionamiento de las redes que conectan nuestro planeta.
«Escrito por uno de los jóvenes científicos de primera línea mundial, este libro sabe despertar el entusiasmo del lector. Las ideas de Watts acerca de las interconexiones que nos unen unos a otros, desde los enlaces en Internet hasta los principales centros intermodales de transporte y el mundo de las finanzas, pasando por las redes de relaciones sexuales por donde se transmite la pandemia del SIDA en todo el mundo, ofrecen un marco de referencia nuevo y dinámico para comprender nuestra sociedad global y sus cambios. Watts explica por qué estamos tan estrechamente conectados en nuestros -mundos pequeños- y, a su vez, conecta al lector con los principales pensadores de hoy en día sobre el nuevo y apasionante campo de la teoría de las redes.»

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Descargar Reseña (por Jorge Miceli)